Category Archives: Sports Medicine Club

Seattle Marathon 2017

On November 25th, BSMC was able to provide another year of voluntary care for the Seattle Marathon runners. Even though it was a dark, windy and rainy morning, there was still over 5,000 runners and walkers that participated in this years event where experience ranged from veteran marathoners to first time runners. The Bastyr Sports Medicine Club in conjunction with the Bastyr’s Acupuncture Sports Medicine Club had the privilege of providing integrative care for the marathon participants in the form of MES, kinesio taping, Tui Na, acupuncture, and craniosacral therapy.

This year we were able to help over 100 patients with post-run stretching, musculoskeletal pain and answer any general health questions they had. Under the guidance of the supervising doctors, students were also able to practice proper patient care by implementing skills learned in classes such as orthopedic testing, acute injury evaluation, soft tissue manipulation and injury prevention. Students this year worked in pods with a primary and secondary student. Pods were then supervised by a club captain who oversaw care and was available for any questions or assistance needed. This chain of command provides students with many opportunities to both practice existing skills, and learn many new techniques by more experienced student physicians.

Thank you to all the students who participated at the event, and were eager to lend their healing hands. Special thanks to our sponsors Integrative Medicine Group, Kinesio Taping Association International, and Bastyr University. We would also like to thank Dr. Masahiro Takakura, ND, LAc, DC, Dr. Tom Yang, ND, LAc, LMP, Dr. Calvin Kwan, ND, Dr. Anh Ngoc Le, ND, LAc, and Dr. Thien Nguyen, ND, LAc for supervising the event. We appreciate them donating their time and expanding our knowledge. Additionally, we’d like to thank Lydia Wang for volunteering her time and coordinating patient intake!

Raymond Chao: “This is my second year volunteering at the Seattle Marathon. It has been a great learning experience all around; we learn how to work as a team, communicate with patients, and practice our skills. Being a dual track student, I am excited to come back in the future to time to see us integrate both Naturopathic Medicine and Acupuncture in an acute setting.”

Kristen Williams: “We had many students coming out with great energies who clearly made time to practice their skills before they came to the Seattle Marathon.  It makes for a smooth day when students come prepared.  Seeing students from different programs work well together was fantastic!  Our goal is for each year & event to better ourselves.”

Jessica Norton: “Volunteering at the Seattle marathon has been an amazing experience. Thanks to our supervisors, I have been able to practice and improve my orthopedic assessment as well as soft tissue and joint manipulations on dozens of patients in a fast paced setting. It has been a great way to synthesize my classroom learning and practical skills!”

Dr. Ngoc: “Each year, our club and organization continues to grow and it is great to see the passion to practice and learn continue to grow as well in all our students and our practitioners.  It takes a lot of time and dedication to prepare for an event and everyone contributes in their own way starting from the supervisor and leadership group to the student members.  Thank you for your efforts and we, practitioners and physicians of Integrative Medicine Group, look forward to our continuing collaborations.”

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2017 Spikefest Charity Grass Volleyball Tournament

During the weekend of August 19th, the Bastyr Sports Medicine Club (BSMC) attended the 6th Annual CSL Chang Family Foundation, Spikefest Charity Grass Volleyball Tournament. This event brought together over 150 athletes aged 14 – 40+ that competed for a good cause. The proceeds of the event went to Urban Impact of Seattle, whose mission is to partner with communities and families to break the cycle of social, material, and spiritual poverty.  For this event, the BSMC, sponsored by Sports Medicine Associates and Integrative Medicine Group, volunteered to be the sole first aid, sports medicine, and medical team for all athletes and participants over the day event.

This event was supervised by Dr. Calvin Kwan, ND who oversaw student members of the BSMC. We provided medical care to over 50 athletes that presented with various conditions including: bruises, ankle injuries, low back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, athlete biomechanics, contusions, and various forms of tendonitis. This was a great opportunity for students to further their Sports Medicine skills. Using appropriate informed consent and confidentiality measures, members were able to practice various modalities including ice therapy, cold friction rubs, soft tissue mobilization and myofascial release, muscle energy stretching and neuromuscular re-education, naturopathic joint manipulations, craniosacral therapy, athletic taping, compression taping, Leukotaping, and Kinesio taping (a generous donation from Kinesiotaping Association). Along with practicing these skills, the students practiced their history taking, physical exam and orthopedic exam skills, accurately using objective assessments, charting and assessment treatment outcomes, triaging acute injuries, wound cleaning and closure, and working in a team to provide optimal medical care!

The BSMC would like to give a big thank-you to Dr. Kwan, ND for taking the time to come out and share his expertise, and the Sports Medicine Associates and Integrative Medicine Group for sponsoring us and making this event possible. We would like to thank Tammy Chin, Hilary Wang, and Lydia Wang for connecting us to this event and allowing us to be the first medical team to oversee the event. Lastly, we would like to thank KT Association for their generous donation. We enjoyed coming out to the event and look forward to returning next year!

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BSMC at Seattle Marathon 2016

     On November 27, 2016 Bastyr Sports Medicine Club and the Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Bastyr Sports Medicine Club provided complimentary naturopathic physical medicine and acupuncture to the athletes at the 2016 Seattle Marathon.  This was BSMC’s 11th appearance at the Seattle Marathon, and students provided physical medicine modalities such as soft tissue massage, muscle energy stretching, kinesio taping, and naturopathic manipulation.  This event exemplified a true integrative model between two different medicines, allowing many patients to receive both naturopathic medicine and acupuncture.  Separate from the sports medicine clubs there were many other health care practitioners volunteering such as the University of Washington Medicine, Washington Sports Massage Team, and Washington State Chiropractic Association.  The Seattle Center became a center of multidisciplinary medical approaches, providing students the opportunity to network and work amongst a diverse group of healthcare practitioners.  Dr. Yang ND, LAc, one of the acupuncture supervisors, states “coming back and witnessing the enthusiasm exuded by both ND and AOM students made me proud to be part of this amazing learning experience.  This event illustrates a true integration of Naturopathic, East Asian and Western Medicine in assessing, triaging, and treating patients.  It’s also a prime venue to introduce our medicine to the masses.”  This event is a great opportunity for students to learn and gain valuable clinical experience. 

     Naturopathic medical students worked together in teams consisting of primary and secondary student clinicians to assess and treat a variety of different cases.  Primary clinicians are students in their third or fourth year of naturopathic medical school who have received more advanced training in clinical assessment and treatment.  These student clinicians are not only responsible for patient assessment, but also teaching and mentoring the secondary student clinicians.  In fact, many secondary clinicians were encouraged to perform muscle energy stretching and soft tissue massage on patients with assistance from primary student clinicians.  Megan Roark, a second-year naturopathic medical students, states “returning as a second-year student was great!  I was able to participate more, but I was also able to obtain new skills from the primaries while observing under them.” 

     The Bastyr Sports Medicine Club would like to thank our sponsors Masa Integrative Clinic, Kinesio Taping Association International, and Bastyr University.  We would also like to thank our clinical supervisors Dr. Masahiro Takakura ND, LAc, Dr. Calvin Kwan ND, Dr. Tom Yang ND, LAc, and Dr. Grace Chang ND, LAc for without them this event would not be possible.  Lastly, BSMC would like to thank student volunteers for giving their commitment and enthusiasm to learning and working together as a team in providing comprehensive medical services. 

     Add Bastyr Sports Medicine Club on Facebook to get the latest information on events. 

Impressions of the event:

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The 2016 US Gaelic Athletic Association Finals

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This year’s US Gaelic Athletic Association Finals were held in Seattle, WA over the Labor day long weekend of September 2nd-4th. Over 100 teams from 50+ cities brought with them over 2,000 athletes aged 16-40+ that competed for titles in Gaelic football, hurling, and camogie. These sports are intense, very physically demanding, and just as exciting to watch! For this event, the Bastyr Sports Medicine Club, sponsored by Masa Integrative Clinic, volunteered to be the sole first aid, sports medicine, and medical team for all athletes and participants over the three-day weekend.

 

Sponsored and overseen by lead supervising physician Dr. Masahiro Takakura ND DC, LAc, and supervising physician Dr. Darci Davis, ND, the student members of the BSMC provided all medical care for the event while seeing over 300 athletes and participants for various presenting conditions, including; bruises/contusions, abrasions, lacerations, shoulder dislocations, ankle injuries, knee pain, hip pain, wrist and finger injuries and dislocations, ligamentous sprains, meniscal tears, muscle strains, athlete biomechanics, low back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain/injuries, fractures, concussions, and various forms of tendonitis. The team of Naturopathic medical students and Doctors also evaluated and referred athletes for emergency medical care when necessary.

 

Organized by the BSMC leadership team, nearly 15 club members arrived to Magnuson Park in Seattle over the weekend to utilize their learned physical medicine skills and provide care for the athletes who played several games throughout the weekend. The BSMC club members spent several weeks planning, training, and prepping for this event. Students from Bastyr’s San Diego campus, and the sports medicine club from Bastyr San Diego, also made the trip up to Seattle to join in on the action! Over nearly 30 hours of total service time, the students worked through quick physical assessments, ruling out injuries and emergency cases, and used a wide variety of physical medicine modalities to help treat the athletes. These modalities included ice therapy, cold friction rubs, soft tissue mobilization and myofascial release, muscle energy stretching and neuromuscular re-education, naturopathic joint manipulations, craniosacral therapy, athletic taping, compression taping, Leukotaping, Kinesiotaping (a gracious donation from Kinesiotaping Association), and splinting/joint immobilization. Along with practicing these skills, the students practiced their history taking, physical exam and orthopedic exam skills, accurately using objective assessments with goniometers, charting and assessment treatment outcomes, neurological evaluation of concussions, triaging acute injuries, wound cleaning and closure, and working in a team to provide optimal medical care! Further, the naturopathic medical students also provided appropriate follow-up treatments and recommendations such as home exercises, stretching, and appropriate medical referrals for conditions that needed more follow up. The high number of patient contacts was a tremendous opportunity for students to hone in on their medical decision-making skills and gain valuable feedback from the supervising doctors.

 

As done so in many previous events, BSMC also worked alongside the Bastyr TCM Sports Medicine club, supervised by Sofina Lin, LAc, providing integrative Naturopathic sports medicine and traditional Chinese medicine to help treat the Gaelic sports athletes! There was also a great collaborative effort to communicate with the dedicated EMT of the event, Bryce, on first aid cases. All in all, it was a tremendous display of collaboration between the various medical teams present at the tournament. The event coordinators also expressed a tremendous appreciation of the work and service provided by the team of students and doctors, and stated that this was the most extensive medical care that has ever been provided at a USGAA event over the last 50+ years!

 

This event also gave the BSMC a unique opportunity to further the Naturopathic sports medicine field. The leadership board and the supervising doctors conducted a treatment quality assurance assessment on all treatment modalities that were provided during the event. Using appropriate informed consent and confidentiality measures, data was collected from all consenting athletes regarding the immediate outcomes of treatment. This information gathered will be organized and analyzed, and presented as a showcase of the effects of Naturopathic principles on the outcomes of sports medicine treatment. This is a very exciting first step in expanding the information available on the use of Naturopathy in the sports medicine world, so definitely be on the look out for updates on this topic! This survey assessment would not have been possible without all the hard work, guidance, and help that was received from Dr. Masa Sasagawa, and the BSMC is incredibly thankful for his support.

 

Finally, BSMC would like to give a big thank-you to our supervising physicians and practitioners for sponsoring the event and taking the time out of their day to help medical students practice their skills and gain valuable real world experience. Also, a huge thank-you goes out to Dr. Ara Walline for connecting us to this event, as well as Dermot Randles, Brian White, Paul McGarry, John Keane, and the entire Seattle Gaelic Atheltic Club, the USGAA Seattle Finals event organizers, for inviting us out and allowing us to practice our medicine. We look forward to future collaborative efforts between the BSMC and the Gaelic Athletic Association. A special thank you also goes out to Jim Clavadetscher, event organizer for the annual Emerald City Championship volleyball tournaments, for all his support and assistance in helping us be prepared and well equipped for this event.

 

 

The student leadership board of the Bastyr Sports Medicine Club present at the event:

Thien Nguyen, Ashok Bhandari, Julieann Murella, Jessica Norton.

 

Leadership advisor/past leadership:

Ngoc Le, Grace Chang, Heather Overland (TCM)

 

Present student members:

Karissa Logan, Giulia Ricciardi, Amanda Blandford, Christine Khuat, Rick McLevich, Kristina Zarlengo, Noryang Yeshi, Ashlee Llamas, Dawn Alden, Celeste Bosworth, Conor “Siri Sadhana” Watters, Phuong Thach, Victora Brewster, Kristen Williams (TCM), Kathy Lai (TCM), Hillary Rodgers (TCM), Yun Xiao (TCM).

 

Cupping

By now you have probably heard about cupping or have seen those strange marks on Michael Phelps and other members of the US olympic swim team. Cupping is an ancient technique used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as well as other ancient healing systems; and it is often effectively used to treat musculoskeletal pain. In TCM cupping is traditionally preformed with glass cups and uses fire to create a vacuum inside the cup before it is placed onto the skin. While the fire technique is still used, new methods are more portable and use glass or plastic cups along with a suction device to create the vacuum. The cup is placed onto the skin and the air sucked out creating a vacuum. As a result of the vacuum action, the skin and underlying tissue are sucked into the cup. The cups remain on the skin for 5-20 minutes and can be moved around to cover a larger area. But what is really going on and how does this help reduce pain?

While the exact mechanism of action behind cupping is still under investigation, there are several theories to explain the therapeutic effects of cupping. One explanation is that the vacuum created lifts the skin into the cup increasing circulation to the area, thus allowing metabolic waste such as lactate to be removed from the muscles (Emerich, 2013). Another theory involves neurotransmitters and the gate theory. This theory suggests that during cupping chemical transmitters such as endorphins are released. This release then blocks pain signals and decreases pain (Rozenfeld, 2015). It has also been proposed that cupping has an effect on the immune system. Cupping creates inflammation of the underlying tissue which in turn can stimulate the immune system and increase lymph flow (Rozenfeld, 2015).

No matter what the mechanism of action, our Bastyr Sports Medicine team as well as the Acupuncture Sports Medicine team have successfully incorporated cupping into treatment at our events. As a result many of our patients have experienced pain relief. For most patients cupping is a safe and effective therapy with few side effects other than mild bruising. Take a look below for an example of cupping in action!

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Rozenfeld, E., & Kalichman, L. (2016). New is the well-forgotten old: The use of dry cupping in musculoskeletal medicine. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies20(1), 173–178. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.11.009

Emerich, M., Braeunig, M., Clement, H. W., Lüdtke, R., & Huber, R. (2014). Mode of action of cupping-Local metabolism and pain thresholds in neck pain patients and healthy subjects. Complementary Therapies in Medicine22(1), 148–158. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2013.12.013